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#1273 Power protection systems manufacturer cuts design time in half

Posted by Ally PLM on 16 April 2014 - 08:49 AM

<div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot...600/Liebert.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ORyAb6O0ieY/U07QP2hIPjI/AAAAAAAABRc/y8AvrKihE8U/s1600/Liebert.jpg" height="129" width="200" /></a>Liebert Corp. designs better with Solid Edge. Liebert effectively re-uses 80 to 90 percent of its design data and achieves annual productivity savings of more than $250,000 in one department. Liebert also cut design time in half while earning ISO 9000 certification and numerous awards for quality. <o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;"><span style="font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;,&quot;serif&quot;; font-size: 12.0pt; mso-fareast-font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;;"><br /></span><b>Learn how<br /></b><a href="http://www.plm.automation.siemens.com/en_us/about_us/success/case_study.cfm?Component=58471&amp;ComponentTemplate=1481">http://www.plm.automation.siemens.com/en_us/about_us/success/case_study.cfm?Component=58471&amp;ComponentTemplate=1481</a><o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;"><b>Try Solid Edge for free</b></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;"><a href="http://allyplm.com/solidedgetrial/">http://allyplm.com/solidedgetrial/</a></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 0.0001pt;"><br /></div>

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#147 Get your hands in there: What Synchronous Technology &quot;feels&quot...

Posted by Community Administrator on 04 November 2012 - 09:00 PM

Wouldn't it be great if you could just reach into your computer, grab your CAD model and make the design changes you need with your hands instead of messing around with sketches? I was watching football the other night (the hockey lockout persists) and I saw this commercial. As a design engineer, there have been times when I wish I could just pick up a part and improve its function by shaping it with my super human strength, just like this guy...

The crazy part is this commercial is Synchronous Technology in a nutshell. This guy didn't go hunting for a feature, edit the sketch, and monkey around with relationships only to watch downstream features fail. He just made his modifications in real time. No features, no sketches, no rules. 

For those of you still designing with old-school computer aided design systems, this is what the jump to Synchronous feels like. 



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#890 More About Solid Edge from Another Non-Native

Posted by MattLombard on 23 October 2013 - 09:15 PM

Solid Edge is getting its share of attention from users of other software. I’ve made the jump. Feeling the stagnation of a product about to take a different direction, I knew that for my own peace of mind, I needed to keep growing, and Solid Edge has provided that opportunity for me. Chris McAndrew wrote […]

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#839 Do You Use a Crystal Ball for Design Intent?

Posted by MattLombard on 30 September 2013 - 10:17 PM

<p>Design intent can be a tricky topic. I’ve heard some people argue that there is no such thing. I myself have tried to rename it “Design For Change”, because I think that makes more sense. In any case, it’s pretty clear that with history-based modeling systems, the best you can say for design intent is that you need to see into the future to establish it, and into the past to use it.</p>
<p><a href="http://ontheedge.dez...ntent?…</a></p>

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#740 Saratech Offer Summertime Deals for CAMWorks for Solid Edge

Posted by Dave Ault on 01 August 2013 - 03:33 AM

Saratech Offer Summertime Deals for CAMWorks for Solid Edge
 

Just a heads up for those of you who are shopping but not on a VAR mailer list yet. Saratech is offering a current promotion that is by far the best deal out there right now for CW4SE (CAMWorks for Solid Edge).
 

“From 25 – 50% Discount on CAMWorks for Solid Edge

We recently introduced CAMWorks for Solid Edge; an embedded CAM program that is fully integrated with Solid Edge.

It is the only feature-based CAM product on the market that leverages synchronous technology! So now the reduced programming time that users have become accustomed to with CAMWorks … has become even more powerful embedded within the “synchronous technology”.
 

For a limited time, we’re able to offer some of the CAMWorks for Solid Edge products at a special introductory price ….

Up to 25 % Discount on CAMWorks Milling Seats
Up to 33% Discount on Milling and VoluMill Bundles
Up to 50% Discount on VoluMill Add Ons”
 

Here is a link

http://www.saratechi...news&Itemid=108


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#739 We will TELL them what to Like

Posted by Dave Ault on 31 July 2013 - 06:30 PM

<p> Well this time off did not last long did it. I received an email from Autodesk that fired me up and so here we go.</p>
<p> This is another true O’Charley’s restaurants story that has a direct bearing in what is happening with Marketing, PR and the community website. This is sadly another true story I watched in person as a company self destructed from really dumb things. This particular event materialy contributed to the downfall of the whole chain.</p>
<p> Some years ago the vice president of the commissary operations for O’Charleys discovered that his division could make more money by reducing the quality of the ingredients but not the price in the products they made for the restaurants. So he sallies forth one day with his revised Honey Mustard dressing and arrives in the lunchroom to ask employee opinions on his latest creation. What he did was take almost all the Honey out leaving it to be just around 5% of content with the rest now being corn syrup. Up to this point in time Honey was the sweetener. As most employees are known to do when their boss asks them for an opinion they give him what they think he wants to hear. Especially if the boss has a propensity to be irate with those who would doubt his divine guidance in all things. Sonny was one of these and so everyone told him how wonderful his sorely degraded product was. Up until he ran into Gerald.</p>
<p> Gerald is a friend of mine and I was up there later that day only to see him with a strange look upon his face. “So, what’s up Gerald”? He then tells me the following story. As noted above every other employee who was asked about Sonny’s brainstorm all told him how good it was. Gerald however no matter what the risks of truth were with this megalomaniacal boss would give him an honest answer. So he tells Sonny that it stinks compared to what it was. Sonny’s response was what floored Gerald. Sonny stated to Gerald that basically customers were ignorant and that they would be educated as to what they would like. Gerald could not believe the disconnect from reality with this and thus the look of bemusement on his face that day. This began the deterioration of all the products produced by the commissary until it got so bad that the commissary was sold off when the chain ran into severe financial problems. It all happened because one individual decided on his own that he knew better than anyone and did not need to ask anyone, most particularly ignorant customers, about the validity and consequences of his actions and decisions. So when the food went downhill the customer counts went downhill and so did profits at the stores. But Sonny could stand in front of a mirror and argue with the best of them about why his decisions were good ones.</p>
<p> This brings me to the Siemens publicity in general and SE Community websites in particular as this story resonates in my mind’s eye. I don’t know who is asked to provide input and feedback for these things. Maybe it has happened but did you have to be there for that 24 hour window of opportunity to give feedback? I don’t remember being asked about any of this stuff so I have a vision of the same people who only talk to each other talking to each other about web site layout and content and agreeing with each other how good it all is. They are really smart people you know and much better at this than viewers would ever be. In the mean time I bet the viewers are staying away.</p>
<p> You know here is the bad thing about metrics and how do you determine if you are succeeding or not. Remember the <a href="http://solidedging.w...solid-edge/</a> post recently here? The numbers looked OK to this guy but he failed to see the truth of it all until remedial action was taken. So here we have a website that may actually have an increase in numbers of views but can these PR wonks bask in the glory of this? Or is the truth of it all that they have no way of comparing what they are doing to what a well done website designed around customer inputs and asked for content would do. I choose to believe that somewhere Sonny or Sonny’s equivalents in Siemens/SE exist that have no desire to do the legwork necessary to find out the truth of it all and use the ask the guy in the mirror method of management and decision-making. </p>
<p> What started me thinking about all this was an invitation recently from Autodesk to go to one of their websites. <a href="http://www.autodesk....ly/overview</a> is a link to it. I go there and shortly after arriving this pops up.<br /><a href="http://solidedging.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/autodesk.jpg"><img src="http://solidedging.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/autodesk.jpg?w=300&h=165" alt="Autodesk" width="300" height="165" class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-1072" /></a></p>
<p> Can you imagine actually asking what a reader wants to see and thinks about the site? Well if I was interested in getting more customers and viewers I sure can. But then I like things to grow and thrive and I care what potential users think about SE and Siemens. Apparently customer desires, inputs and requests are things that frequent only the technical side of Siemens SE.</p>
<p> Oh, and by the way, did you notice how Autodesk did not take up the top right half of the initial page with corporate Bios and gobs and gobs of just blank nothing? Which one of you marketing PR paragons figured this was something that should be there anyway is what I want to know. Every time I see this my eyes roll back in my head. Remember the admonishment for parents some years ago that said “It’s 9:00, do you know where your children are?”. Well I think a byline to my posts from now on just might be “It’s 8:00 AM, do you know where your PR and marketing staff is?”</p>
<p> There is even a book that I think Sonny would have endorsed before he went bankrupt that sounds like it might be tailor made for these guys <img src='http://s0.wp.com/wp-...smiley' /> </p>
<p> <a href="http://solidedging.f...083" /></a></p>
<br /> Tagged: <a href='http://solidedging.w..." height="1" />

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#575 Article - Peer Variables command

Posted by Community Administrator on 17 May 2013 - 04:04 PM

Accesses the variables for another part or subassembly. You can edit, copy, and paste variables between parts within an assembly.

Note:

In ordered modeling, before you can paste variable links in the Variable Table, you must set the Paste Link to Variable Table option on the Inter-Part tab of the Options dialog box.

What are you looking for?
(Hold down CTRLkey to open links in a new window)

Peer Variables command bar
Variable Table
Filter dialog box
Function Wizard Step 1 of 2 dialog box
Function Wizard Step 2 of 2 dialog box



How do ILearn more aboutLook up more details

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#561 Northeast Ohio Solid Edge User Group Survey

Posted by John J Bazaar on 14 May 2013 - 04:02 AM

I would like members of this user group to consider these questions to help me plan the next few meetings.

Thanks, John

  1.How long do you think a typical Users' Group should meet?
  • 2-4 hours
  • 1-2 hours
  • 60 mins Max
  • Half day
  • All day
2.What time of day do you prefer to meet?
  • Business Hours 8am - 12pm
  • Business Hours 12pm - 4pm
  • After Hours 4pm - 8pm
3.How often are you willing to participate in a Users' Group?
  • Quarterly (every 4 months)
  • Every Other Month
  • Monthly
  • Bi-Annual (every 6 months)
  • Yearly
  • Never
4.Please rank these possible agenda items. 1=Most Desired
  • Professional networking
  • Presentation (Best Practices, Industry Standards, etc.)
  • Hands On (Design Challenge)
  • Tips & Tricks (Shortcuts, Hotkeys, Back to the Basics)
  • Ask the Expert (Stump the chump)
  • Social / Fun event
  • Live Solid Edge Feature Demo (What's New)
  • Peer User Demo (Real World Use Case)

 

5.Are you willing to present examples of your design techniques?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Maybe

 

6.Are you willing to help organize the User Group meeting? Effort is typically minimal
  • Yes
  • No
  • Maybe
7.If yes or maybe, what are you willing to help with?
  • Arrange for door prizes
  • Arrange for presenters
  • Arrange for meeting room
  • Communicate with User Group members
8.Please provide additional comments/suggestions:

 

 


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#501 Article - Curve display and edit

Posted by Community Administrator on 29 April 2013 - 12:40 AM

Posted Image Displaying curves



You can use the options on the Curve command bar to control the display of a curve.
The Add/Remove Points button adds or removes edit points along the curve. When you add an edit point, the shape of the curve does not change. If the number of edit points on the curve is the same as the number of control vertex points, adding an edit point adds a corresponding control vertex point. The control vertex point moves to maintain the shape of the curve.

When you remove edit points, the control vertex points move, and the shape of the curve changes.


Note:
If there are only two edit points on the curve, you cannot remove an edit point from the curve.




See Insert or remove points on a curve.
Posted Image
The Show Polygon button displays the control polygon of the curve, which you can use to edit the curve.
Posted Image
The edit points and control vertex points are handles that you can drag to change the shape of the curve.
Posted Image
Note:

You can also use these points as keypoints for relationships and dimensions.



The Show Curvature Comb button displays the curvature comb for the curve. This helps you determine how quickly or gradually curves change and where they change direction.
Posted Image
You can use the Curvature Comb Settings command to control the density and magnitude of the curve.



Editing curves
You can edit curves at any time via one of two methods for editing curves.
  • Edit Profile mode: Just like editing a sketch.
    Posted Image
  • Dynamic Edit mode: Shows all of the control and edit points.
    Posted Image
When you move a control point or edit point, the curve updates automatically; any surface that has the curve as one of its defining entities will update dynamically.

The Add/Remove Points and Curve Options buttons are disabled in dynamic edit mode. These options are only available in Edit Profile mode.

Posted Image Add/Remove Points

Posted Image Show Polygon

Posted Image Show Curvature Comb

Posted Image Shape Edit

Posted Image Local Edit

Posted Image Close Curve

Posted Image Curve Options




The Curve command bar controls how the shape of the curve changes when you make changes to the edit points and control vertex points.

The Shape Edit and Local Edit buttons control the shape of the curve when you move a point on the curve.
When you select the Shape Edit button, you affect the shape of the entire curve when you move a point on the curve.
Posted Image
When you select the Local Edit button, you affect the shape of the curve around the edit point.
Posted Image
With Local Edit, if you drag a vertex point on an unconstrained curve, no other vertex points will move. However, if you drag a vertex point on a curve that has some relationships, then other vertex points may move as well. This allows the curve to adapt to the new location of the vertex point you moved while still maintaining the relationships.

Note:
You cannot drag an edit point that is fully constrained.


You can select the Curve Options button to display the Curve Options dialog box. You can use this dialog box to change the number of degrees for the curve and to specify the relationship mode for the curve. You can set the relationship mode to:
  • Flexible
  • Rigid
In Flexible mode you can use external relationships to control the shape of the curve. For example, you can apply a dimension relationship on the curve and as you make changes to the dimensions, the shape of the curve automatically updates.
Posted Image
In Rigid mode you cannot use external relationships to control the shape of the curve. Instead, the curve shape remains unchanged and the curve simply rotates.
Posted Image


Simplifying curves
You can use the Simplify Curve command to simplify a polygon-based curve by reducing the number of edit points and control vertex points on a curve. The Simplify Curve dialog box increases or decreases a fit tolerance for the curve.

Note:
Simplifying a curve can cause the relationships placed on a curve to be deleted.


What are you looking for?
(Hold down CTRL key to open links in a new window)


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#497 Article - BlueSurf Options Dialog Box

Posted by Community Administrator on 25 April 2013 - 05:52 PM

Standard Tab Options


Tangency Control

Specifies the options you want for controlling the shape at the ends of the feature. For example, when you are creating a BlueSurf feature that must blend smoothly with adjacent surfaces, you can set the Normal to Section option to ensure a smooth blend between the existing surfaces.

The following options are available, depending on the geometry you select for the cross section or guide curve:
  • Natural—There are no constraining condition enforced at the end sections. This is the default end condition and is valid for any cross section type.
Posted Image
  • Normal to Section—End cross sections that are planar support a normal to section end condition. You can control the length of the vector using the variable table or by modifying the vector handle in the graphic window. In this example, the resultant surface illustrates the graphic handles (1) that you can use to modify the surface.
Posted Image
  • Parallel to Section—End cross sections that are planar support a parallel to section end condition. You can control the length of the vector using the variable table or by modifying the vector handle in the graphic window. To see the effect of this setting, compare the following illustration of Parallel to Section with the Normal to Section example.
    Posted Image
  • Tangent Interior—End cross sections defined using part edges and construction surfaces support a tangent interior condition. Tangent Interior forces the surface to be tangent to the inside faces. For example, the surface below has the Tangent Continuous option applied to cross section (1), and the Tangent Interior option applied to cross section (2). The resulting surface is constructed tangent to the planar face (3).
    Posted Image
  • Tangent Continuous—End cross sections defined using part edges and construction curves support a tangent condition. The tangent vector for the surface is determined by the adjacent surfaces. You can control the length of the vector using the variable table or by modifying the vector handle in the graphic window.
    Posted Image
  • Curvature Continuous—End cross sections defined using part edges and construction surfaces support a curvature continuous condition. The tangent vector for the surface is determined by the adjacent surfaces. You can control the length of the vector using the variable table or by modifying the vector handle in the graphic window.
    Posted Image
For more information and illustrations which show you how you can control the surface shape at the ends of BlueSurf and lofted features, see the End Conditions section in the Constructing Lofted Features (ordered) or Constructing Lofted Features (synchronous) Help topics.



Start Section
Specifies the tangency control option you want for the first cross section.

End Section
Specifies the tangency control option you want for the last cross section.

Edge Guide 1
Specifies the tangency control option you want for the first guide curve. The options available for defining guide curve tangency conditions depend on the type of element you select for the guide curve. For example, if you want to be able to control the tangency of the BlueSurf feature with respect to an adjacent surface, use an edge on the surface as the guide curve rather than, for example, the sketch that was used to construct the adjacent surface.


Edge Guide 2
Specifies the tangency control option you want for the last guide curve.  The options available for defining guide curve tangency conditions depend on the type of element you select for the guide curve. For example, if you want to be able to control the tangency of the BlueSurf feature with respect to an adjacent surface, use an edge on the surface as the guide curve rather than, for example, the sketch that was used to construct the adjacent surface.



End Capping

Specifies the end capping options you want. This option is available only when the cross section profiles are closed.


Open Ends
Specifies that no planar end caps are added to the feature.

Close Ends
Specifies that planar end caps are added to the feature to create a enclosed volume.


Extent type

Controls whether or not the feature closes on itself.

Open
Specifies that the feature begins with the first cross section and ends with the last cross section. The feature does not close on itself.

Closed
Specifies that the surface will close on itself. When you set this option, the first cross section is also used for the last cross section.


Curve Connectivity

Specifies how a cross section and a guide curve are connected. These options only apply to new sketches you add using the Insert sketch button on the command bar.





Use Pierce Points

Specifies that a connect relationship is used to connect the cross section and guide curve where they intersect. The position of the connect relationship is calculated using the Pierce Point option on the IntelliSketch dialog box. The Use Pierce Points option is typically used when constructing engineered surfaces, such as the surfaces for a fan or turbine blade, where engineering data or dimension-driven criteria must be maintained.



Use BlueDots
Specifies that a BlueDot is used to connect the cross section and guide curve where they intersect. When you connect a cross section and a guide curve with a BlueDot , you can use the BlueDot as a handle to dynamically modify the shape of the cross section and guide curve. The Use BlueDots option is typically used when constructing esthetic surfaces, such as the surfaces for consumer electronics product, where a more free-form approach to surface design is desired.


Note:
The Use BlueDots option is available only in the ordered modeling environment. The BlueDots functionality is not available in the synchronous environment.


Inserted-Sketch

Allows you to define a tolerance value for sketches you insert. The tolerance value you specify is used to control the complexity of the curve that is created.

Tolerance
Specifies the tolerance value you want to use.

Advanced Tab Options

Vertex Mapping
Vertex mapping is a technique to help create flow between section vertices; you can map a vertex or point on one cross section to a vertex or point on another cross section. Vertex mapping is useful for controlling or eliminating twists and discontinuities in a surface. If there is a vertex count mismatch between sections, equally spaced vertices are used on each section.

You can add vertex maps while creating a BlueSurf or by editing an existing BlueSurf.
Notice in the first image below that section (A) has four vertices and section (B ) has three vertices. The BlueSurf command automatically inserts vertices equally spaced on each section. Notice the surface flow is not smooth.
Posted Image
The result of vertex mapping.
Posted Image

Map Sets
Lists the sets of mapped vertices you have defined. You can add vertex map sets to create a smooth surface flow; to add a new set of mapped vertices, click the Add button, then click a point on each cross section curve.


Add
Allows you to add a new mapped vertex set.



Delete
Allows you to add a delete an existing mapped vertex set.



Reorder

Allows you to reorder cross sections that were defined out-of-sequence. This option is useful when you modify an existing feature by adding a new cross section. You cannot use the reordering capability to create a feature that intersects itself.

To reorder a cross section, select the cross section in the list, then click the Up or Down buttons to move the cross section entry in the list.

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#440 I’m Presenting at Solid Edge University 2013

Posted by MattLombard on 04 April 2013 - 05:07 AM

<p>I was at SEU last year, and learned a lot about the Solid Edge community, the software, and the company behind it. This year I get to be a part of it in a different way. I’m presenting a session on combining ordered modeling with Synchronous Technology. This will be my first time presenting anything having to do with Solid Edge. I’ve presented many times at other international CAD conferences, and dozens of times at local CAD user groups, but bringing all of that to a new software is still a little daunting.</p>
<p><a href="http://ontheedge.dez...rsity-2013/1040" class="more-link">Read more on I’m Presenting at Solid Edge University 2013…</a></p>

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#43 Tapatalk Support

Posted by Community Administrator on 01 July 2012 - 03:06 PM

The forum will support the Tapatalk application and will be made public on Tapatalk network later in august/September

In waiting for the public announcement, Those who are invite for the private launche of SEcommunity can test the application and give feedback.



Tapatalk is a forum app on the iPhone, Android, webOS, Windows Phone 7 and BlackBerry. Tapatalk Forum App provides super fast on-the-go forum access to majority of the discussion forums that has activated the Tapatalk plugin.

Showing New and Unread Thread with Avatar and Number of reply:
Posted Image

Images in the thread are converted to thumbnail and allow full-screen viewing
Posted Image

Ability to see Who's Online and what they are doing:
Posted Image

Ability to search by topics and posts:
Posted Image

Ability to upload images directly from Android and iPhone!:
Posted Image

Forum Moderation support:
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Check out http://www.tapatalk.com for more information!

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#415 Welcome

Posted by Terry on 25 March 2013 - 05:39 AM

Welcome to the South Texas Solid Edge User Group. The purpose of this forum is to facilitate communications and meetings for the members of the group. If you live in the South Texas area please feel free to join in and recommend meetings and topics. It's a large area but we will try to schedule meetings to serve as many members as possible.


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#357 What most schools don’t teach

Posted by Susan Cinadr on 04 March 2013 - 04:56 AM

My friend, Matt Johnson, came across this great video on “coding” and sent it to those of us working on Solid Edge Developer Day.  It is inspirational.

If you ever thought writing software was hard, this is something good to watch.  Like music or learning to write there are a lot of levels.  You don’t have to be a virtuoso for it to be helpful in your real life.

Check out some courses around you. Learn some web programming.  Take a VB.net class. Learn some scripts for your favorite game.

If you learn VB.net (or C++ for you advances students), bring it with you to Solid Edge University. The video talked about using programming in manufacturing and this is a great place to get started.



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#308 Article - Constructing swept synchronous features

Posted by Community Administrator on 04 February 2013 - 03:34 PM

You can use the Swept Protrusion, Swept Cutout, and Swept Surface commands to create swept features.

Posted Image
Swept features are constructed by extruding one or more cross sections A along one or more path curves B.
Posted Image
You can define the paths and cross sections by:
  • Selecting elements from an existing sketch
  • Selecting edges on the model or a construction body
  • Selecting derived elements, such as intersection curves and derived curves
Using Sketches
The ability to define paths and cross sections using sketches is especially useful when working with swept features and lofted features. Drawing sketches first allows you to draw the wireframe geometry without constructing the feature. This approach also allows you to experiment with both swept and lofted features using the same sketch geometry.
You can also define relationships between sketches on different planes. For example, you may need to use connect relationships (A) between path and cross section keypoints.
Posted Image
You can also use the Project to Sketch command to copy part edges into sketch, then use the sketch in a swept feature.

Using Part Edges and Derived Elements

You can use edges of existing surface and solid geometry to define path curves or cross sections. You can also use derived elements, such as intersection curves, contour curves, cross curves, wrapped curves, and so forth to define path curves or cross sections.


Path Curves
You can define up to three path curves. You can define open or closed path curves. When constructing swept features with more than one path curve, select the elements for the first path curve, then click the Accept button. Repeat this process for the second path curve. When constructing a swept feature using three paths, after you define the third path, the command automatically proceeds to the cross section step.

When using more than one path or cross section, each path curve must be a continuous set of tangent elements or edges. For example, if you define a path curve using a sketch, the elements must be tangent at their connect points (A).

Posted Image


Note:

The path curve does not have to be tangent for a swept protrusion constructed with a single path and a single cross section.
When using more than one path curve, the order in which you select the path curves can affect the shape of the feature. A swept feature is allowed to deviate from the first path curve you select. The swept feature typically will not deviate from subsequent path curves. Because of this, you can change the shape of a swept feature by changing the order that you select the path curves. Path selection order can also determine whether the feature is constructed successfully, or fails to recompute properly.


In some cases, you also may want to consider constructing a loft or BlueSurf feature instead of a swept feature. For more information, see the Comparing Swept, Lofted, and BlueSurf Features section.


Cross Sections
For swept protrusions and cutouts, the cross sections must be closed elements that can be planar or non-planar and you can place them anywhere along the path. For swept surfaces, the cross sections can be open or closed.

The cross sections must intersect the paths. If the cross section is a non-periodic element, you also must define its start point (A). Position the cursor near the vertex that you want to use as the start point, then click.

Posted Image

You do not have to define the start point for a cross section that is a periodic element.

When working with swept features that have multiple cross sections, you must select the start point for all non-periodic cross sections.
Defining appropriate start points allows you to prevent or control twisting. For example, different results are obtained when you define the starts points as A to A or A to B. In some cases, mismatched start points can result in failed features.
Posted Image


Cross Section Sequence
When constructing swept features with multiple cross sections, each cross section you define adds an entry to the Cross Section Order dialog box.
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When you add new cross sections, the system adds them after the existing cross sections, regardless of their physical orientation with respect to the path curve and existing cross sections.

When you modify an existing swept feature by adding new cross sections, you can use the Cross Section Order dialog box to define the cross section sequence to be used when the feature is constructed. For example, you can specify that the feature is constructed using cross section (1) first, then cross section (3), and finally cross section (2).
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Sweep Options Dialog Box
For new swept features constructed in version 18 or later, you can use the Sweep Options dialog box to set options that give you additional control over the shape of the feature. You can use the dialog box to set options that control section alignment with respect to the path curve, face merging, and face continuity.
  • Section Alignment
    The Section Alignment options allow you to control how the faces defined by cross section curves are oriented with respect to the path curves. Depending on the input curves, some options may provide better results. If one option does not give you the result you want, experiment with the other options.
    For example, using the same input sketches, different results are achieved by changing the Section Alignment option from Normal A to Parallel B. In this example, the bottom path curve P1 was selected first. Notice that the feature deviates from the path curve when using the Normal option with this set of sketches, but does not deviate from the path curve when using the Parallel option.
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  • Face Merging
    The face merging options allow you to specify whether or not faces on the feature are merged. Specifies the face merging option you want. You can specify that faces are not merged A, fully merged B, or merged only along the path C. This can be seen more easily if Part Painter is used to change the surface color.
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    If you change the face merging options on a swept feature after downstream features that depend on the original faces are constructed, the downstream features may not recompute properly.
  • Face Continuity
    The face continuity options allow you to specify the degree of continuity between adjacent segments within a swept feature.
Defining a Locking Axis
When you construct swept features with a non-planar path and one or more cross sections you can define a locking axis for the cross section profile during the Axis Step. A locking axis allows you to control twist in a swept feature.

When you select a locking axis A, the cross section profile and resultant surfaces maintain a fixed relationship with the plane that is normal to the locking axis direction, which is constant B. With no locking axis specified, the cross section profile and resultant surfaces maintain a fixed relationship with the plane normal to the path, which varies C. In this example, you could also use the vertical line D in the cross section profile to define the locking axis.
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Note:

The path cannot be parallel to the lock axis at any point.



Comparing Swept, Lofted, and BlueSurf Features
When working with models that require complex or free-form geometry, such as those with multiple paths and cross sections, you may want to experiment with swept, lofted, and BlueSurf features, and compare the results. Depending on the input geometry and options you set, one feature type may you give more desirable results than the other. The following outlines the major differences between these features.
  • Swept features must always have at least one, but not more than three path curves. They can have one or more cross sections.
  • Lofted features must have at least two cross sections. They can have no guide curves, or one or more guide curves.
  • BlueSurf features must have at least one guide curve and one cross section, or at least two cross sections and no guide curves. You can also create new guide curves and cross sections dynamically within the command by intersecting a BlueSurf feature with a plane.
For more information, see the Constructing Lofted Features Help topic.


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#304 How to Open and EDIT a .step File

Posted by Community Administrator on 31 January 2013 - 11:41 AM

Open .step files

We have said it time and time again: We live in a multi-CAD world.

Opening data created by someone else in another CAD package is an ongoing headache for many design engineers. Solid Edge is here to help. Solid Edge from Siemens PLM Software gives users the ability to open a handful of industry standard file types including .step files.

Not only can Solid Edge open these files, once inside the Solid Edge modelling space, users can continue to edit those designs. The intelligence within Solid Edge picks up on the design intent within your part or assembly files.

This is, after all, the natural process of designing. Rarely is a part conceived and designed from beginning to end in one fell swoop by one individual. Design is an ongoing, iterative process and Solid Edge caters to that process.

Open and edit your .step files with a free Solid Edge trial.


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#154 Using Sketch Points for QA

Posted by Community Administrator on 22 August 2012 - 08:00 PM

This came up on a recent tour I took of one of the many new technology companies springing up on the outskirts of Airdrie, AB. Often a set of key dimensions drives the design of a part, and if quality assurance  is part of the post-manufacturing phase, then it makes sense to leverage these key dimensions to provide consistency across the design through manufacture process.

In Solid Edge, this is a great opportunity to use Product Manufacturing Information features to add annotations and dimensions to the 3D model. These can be brought into the draft environments when QA drawings are being prepared, linking together design and post-manufacture inspection.

The following videos show an example of how to

Part 1

Part 2



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#138 MediaHow Halloween pumpkin is made in Solid Edge ST5

Posted by Community Administrator on 24 November 2012 - 11:18 AM

This video show how to use various Solid Edge feature to model a pumpkin then render the design

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#1217 Why I Changed Camps: Part 1

Posted by MattLombard on 13 March 2014 - 04:54 PM

<p><a href="http://ontheedge.dez...1/1495/images-2" rel="attachment wp-att-1500"><img class="alignright size-full wp-image-1500" alt="images" src="http://ontheedge.dezignstuff.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/images.jpg" width="204" height="204" /></a>I get contacted every now and then by people or companies doing research before buying a new CAD package.They are interested in the story of a prominent user changing camps. Since I took down the Dezignstuff blog, most of the story that took me from SolidWorks posterboy to Solid Edge employee has been lost. I just want to have the real story on the record and available to those who are curious.</p>
<p><a href="http://ontheedge.dez...mps-part-1/1495" class="more-link">Read more on Why I Changed Camps: Part 1…</a></p>

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#1211 Blast from the Past: Stepping outside of the parametric feature-based paradig...

Posted by MattLombard on 06 March 2014 - 04:27 PM

<p> </p>
<div>
<p><em>I’m going through some of my old Dezignstuff blog posts and republishing some of the less embarrassing ones. It’s fun to watch my point of view evolve over time. I might edit some of them here and there. For those of you out there who are going through the discovery of history-free CAD, some of the ideas in these posts might feel familiar to you.</em></div>
<p><a href="http://ontheedge.dez...solidworks/1482" class="more-link">Read more on Blast from the Past: Stepping outside of the parametric feature-based paradigm in SolidWorks…</a></p>

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